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Galnuts Galls Powder Quercus infectoria

    • Supports Blood Clotting & as Anti-oxidants
    • Supports bacteria fighting response & urinary tract health
    • Supports Loose motions control response
    • Supports as astringent response in bleeding gums

    Majuphal consists of dried galls found on Quercus infectoria tree (Fam. Fagaceae), a small tree or shrub, 2 to...

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$17.99 USD

  • Supports Blood Clotting & as Anti-oxidants
  • Supports bacteria fighting response & urinary tract health
  • Supports Loose motions control response
  • Supports as astringent response in bleeding gums

Majuphal consists of dried galls found on Quercus infectoria tree (Fam. Fagaceae), a small tree or shrub, 2 to 5 meter high, native of Greece, Asia Minor, Syria, Persia and Iran. The galls are excrescences on the twigs, resulting from the puncture & deposit of an egg or eggs of an insect (Cynips gallae tinctoria) on the rudimentary leaves, buds of various species of oak. These are known as Oak galls & are generally imported into India.
As per Ayurveda Majuphal is astringent, dry and light in nature; cool in potency and helps to pacify pitta & kapha. In Ayurveda it has been successfully used for controlling loose motions in intestinal problems, piles, Women gynaecological irregular discharges, dental infections and swellings in the gums.
In modern days decoction or infusion prepared from Majuphal or Oak galls is usually employed as an astringent wash (for skin problems, tightening of loose tissue fibers), enema (for prolapsed or descent of rectum) or for gargling (for sore-throat, enlargement of tonsils, stomatitis). The powder of Majuphal is randomly used to promote relief from diarrhoea or dysentery. Oak galls support healthy urine flow with reduction of albumen excretion. Majuphal promotes antioxidant response and helps healthy clotting of blood to prevent haemoglobin loss. Oak gall powder is also recommended as tooth/ gum scrub to arrest bleeding and strengthen the gum lining.
As per Scientific study the Oak galls from Quercus infectoria contain the highest natural occurring level of tannin, approx. 50–70%; they also contain 2-4% each of gallic and ellagic acid that are polymerized to make tannins. Tannins have been used for hundreds of years for medical purposes and are currently indispensable in dermatology and have been used for tanning of leather. Hydrolyzable tannins [gallic and ellagic acid] are present in many different plant species but are found in particularly high concentrations in Oak galls growing on Quercus infectoria. The gallic and ellagic acid hydrolyzable tannins react with proteins to produce typical tanning effects; medicinally, this is important to externally support relief from inflamed or ulcerated tissues. They also contribute to most of the astringent property of Oak galls and in small insignificant doses, are great for skin whitening and killing microorganisms.

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